Indian Articles: JHS in Indian Military Population


This is the first study on BJHS carried out in a Rheumatology Centre of the India Military Services.

Clinical profile of benign joint hypermobility syndrome from a tertiary care military hospital in India


Mullick, Gautam, et al. "Clinical profile of benign joint hypermobility syndrome from a tertiary care military hospital in India." International journal of rheumatic diseases 16.5 (2013): 590-594.

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Summary of the article: Eighty four army personnel diagnosed with BHJS were studied for demographic, clinical and other epidemiological details. The male to female ratio was 1.15 : 1, which is markedly different from the female preponderance observed in world over. The authors do not discuss this, but I think it is related to the preponderance of males in the armed forces. There was knee joint pain in all the patients, possibly because knee is a frequent site of injury in military training. The authors mention a "lateral head tilt" sign they observed in some patients, which could be attributable to a hypermobile cervical spine.


The authors conclude:
BJHS is often under-recognized in clinical practice and is usually missed because of a lack of awareness. A high index of clinical suspicion to diagnose this entity is essential due to its associated morbidities, especially among those exposed to strenuous physical activities